Sunday, July 15, 2012

Meal

A meal is an instance of eating, specifically one that takes place at a specific time and includes specific, prepared food.

Meals occur primarily at homes, restaurants, and cafeterias, but may occur anywhere. Regular meals occur on a daily basis, typically several times a day. Special meals are usually held in conjunction with such occasions as birthdays, weddings, anniversaries, and holidays.

A meal is different from a snack in that meals are larger, more varied, and more filling than snacks.

A picnic is an outdoor meal where one brings one's food, such as a sandwich or a prepared meal (sometimes in a picnic basket). It often takes place in a natural or recreational area, such as a park, forest, beach, or grassy lawn. On long drives a picnic may take place at a roadside stop such as a rest area.

A banquet is a large, often formal, elaborate meal, with many guests and dishes.

Most Western-world multicourse meals follow a standard sequence, influenced by traditional French haute cuisine. Each course is supposed to be designed with a particular size and genre that befits its place in the sequence. There are variations depending on location and custom. The following is a common sequence for multicourse meals:
  1. The meal begins with an appetizer, a small serving that usually does not include red meat. It is sometimes referred to as a soup course, as soups, bisques, and consommés are popular entreés. In Italian custom, antipasto is served, usually finger food that does not contain pasta or any starch. In the United States the term appetizer is usually used in place of entrée, as entrée refers to the main course.
  2. This may be followed by a variety of dishes, including a possible fish course or other relevés (lighter courses), each with some kind of vegetable. The number and size of these intermittent courses is entirely dependent on local custom.
  3. Following these is the main course or entre. This is the most important course and is usually the largest. The main course is called an entrée in the United States.
  4. Next comes the salad course, although salad may often refer to a cooked vegetable, rather than the greens most people associate with the word. According to The Joy of Cooking, greens serve "garnish duty only" in a salad course. Note that in the United States, Canada, Great Britain, and parts of Europe, the salad course (usually a green salad) is served at some point before the main course. Sometimes, the salad also accompanies the cheese course.
  5. The meal may carry on with a cheese selection, accompanied by an appropriate selection of wine. In many countries cheeses will be served before the meal as an appetizer, and in the United States often between the main course and dessert, just like in Western European countries. Nuts are also a popular after-meal selection (thus the common saying "from soup to nuts," meaning from beginning to end).
  6. The meal will often culminate with a dessert, either hot or cold, sometimes followed with a final serving of hot or cold fruit and accompanied by a suitable dessert wine.
Sorbet or other palate cleansers might be served between courses.

Before the meal, a host might serve a selection of appetizers or hors d'œuvres with appropriate wine or cocktails, and after the meal, a host might serve snacks, sweets such as chocolate, coffee, and after-dinner drinks (cognac, brandy, liqueur, or similar). These are not considered courses in and of themselves.

A meal may also begin with an amuse-bouche, also called an amuse-gueule, a tiny bite-sized morsel served before the hors d'œuvre or first course of a meal. Often accompanied by a complementary wine, these are served to excite the taste buds, to prepare the guest for the meal, and to offer a glimpse into the chef's approach to cooking.

An entremet is a small dish that may be served between courses, or as a dessert.
Mealtimes

Common meals
The type of meal served or eaten at any given time varies by custom and location. Further, the names of meals are often interchangeable by custom as well, such as some will serve dinner as the main meal at midday, with supper as the late afternoon/early evening meal and others may call their midday meal lunch and their early evening deal supper. These can vary from region to region or even family to family.
  1. Breakfast is usually eaten within an hour or two after a person wakes in the morning.
  2. Lunch or dinner is eaten around mid-day, usually between 11 am and 2 pm. In some areas, the name will change between these two depending on the content of the meal.
  3. Dinner or tea is a meal eaten in the evening. In some areas, the name will change between these two depending on the content of the meal.
  4. Supper is often a meal eaten later in the evening, prior to retiring for bed.
Other meals
  1. Second breakfast is a traditional mid-morning meal served in parts of central Europe.
  2. Elevenses, also called "morning tea", is a drink and light snack taken late morning after breakfast and before lunch.
  3. Brunch is a late-morning meal, usually larger than a breakfast and usually replacing both breakfast and lunch; it is most common on Sundays.
  4. Afternoon tea is a mid-afternoon meal, typically taken at 4 pm, consisting of light fare such as small sandwiches, individual cakes and scones with tea.
  5. High tea is a British meal usually eaten in the early evening.
  6. Last meal is a meal served to a prisoner before his execution.
source: wikipedia

Entrée

 An entrée (/ˈɑːntreɪ/AHN-tray; French "entrance") is a dish served before the main course, or between two principal courses of a meal.

The disappearance in the early 20th century of a large communal main course such as a roast as a standard part of the meal in the English-speaking world has led to the term being used to describe the main course itself in some areas. This usage is largely confined to North America and it is unusual in most English speaking countries, however this use is given by some British dictionaries but not others.

The term entrée is rarely used for an hors d'oeuvre, also called a first course, appetizer, or starter. In France, however, the term "entrée", a French word which means an entrance or beginning, always describes a first course not the main course.

In 1970, Richard Olney, an American living in Paris, gave the place of the entrée in a French full menu: "A dinner that begins with a soup and runs through a fish course, an entrée, a sherbet, a roast, salad, cheese and dessert, and that may be accompanied by from three to six wines, presents a special problem of orchestration". In 1967 Julia Child and her co-authors outlined the character of such entrées, which – when they did not precede a roast – might serve as the main course of a luncheon, in a chapter of "Entrées and Luncheon Dishes" that included quiches, tarts and gratins, soufflés and timbales, gnocchi, quenelles and crêpes.

In some areas, a salad such as this may be presented as an entrée.
In the United States and parts of Canada, the main course is called the entree
 source: wikipedia

Saturday, July 14, 2012

How To Use Chopsticks


Crema de Fruta

Ingredients (Sponge Cake)
  • Use the same ingredients as the Mamon
Ingredients (Custard)
  • 3 1/2 cups full cream milk
  • 5 egg yolks
  • 3/4 cup confectioners’ sugar
  • 4 tbsp flour
Ingredients (Gelatine)
  • 1 1/2 cups pineapple juice
  • 2 tbsp unflavoured gelatine
  • 1 cup water
  • 6 tbsp sugar
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
Ingredients (Others)
  • 1 can sliced peaches
  • 1 can sliced pineapples
  • dozen preserved cherries
Method (Sponge Cake)
  • Use the same method as the mamon but instead of using individual moulds use 2 x 9in round pans.
Method (Custard)
  1. Combine all custard ingredients in a saucepan, constantly stir in low heat until mixture thickens.
  2. Once it turns to custard remove from heat and let it cool.
Method (Gelatine)
  1. Combine all gelatine ingredients in a saucepan, constantly stir in low heat until the gelatine dissolves.
  2. Remove from heat then set it aside.
Method (Crema de Fruta)
  1. Get your sponge cake then place it in a serving pan; spread the custard filling on top and arrange the fruits on top.
  2. Place the second sponge cake on top of the first layer; spread the custard filling on top and arrange the fruits on top.
  3. Pour gelatine on top, and then chill in fridge until set.
source: angsarap.net

Mamon

Ingredients:
  • 8 eggs (whites and yolks separated)
  • 1 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 1 tbsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 3/4 cups flour, sifted
  • 1/3 cup butter, melted
  • 1/3 tsp orange extract
  • 1/4 tsp lemon extract
  • 1 tsp cream of tartar
  • grated cheddar cheese
  Method:
  1. Using and mixer beat together egg yolks, 1/2 cup sugar and 1/3 cup water at high speed.
  2. Once evenly mixed add baking powder, salt, flour, melted butter, orange extract and lemon extract using low speed.  Set aside.
  3. In a separate bowl combine egg whites and cream of tartar then beat at high speed. Gradually add the remaining sugar a spoonful at a time and continue beating until stiff.
  4. Fold in the yolk mixture into the egg white mixture.
  5. Place in muffin pans lined with muffin cups, pour until 3/4 full. Then bake on a preheated oven at 180C for 15 minutes.
  6. Once cooked generously brush mamon with melted butter on top this makes the top sticky when it sets, then add grated cheese.
source: angsarap.net

Cassava Cake

Ingredients (Cassava Cake)
  • 1kg grated cassava
  • 1 1/2 large can coconut milk
  • 1 large can evaporated milk
  • 1/2 can condensed milk
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1/2 cup butter, melted
  • 1/2 cup grated cheddar cheese
  • 1 cup brown sugar 1 bottle macapuno (Coconut Sport) 
Ingredients (Topping)
  • 1/2 large can coconut milk
  • 1/2 can condensed milk
  • 2 tbsp flour
  • 2 tbsp sugar 2 egg yolks, beaten
Method:
  1.  In a large mixing bowl combine all Cassava Cake ingredients; mix thoroughly until even in consistency.
  2. Pour cassavba mix in a greased baking tray, spread macapuno on top then bake in a 180C preheated oven for 45 minutes.
  3. While baking in a sauce pan mix together topping ingredients, mix thoroughly until even in consistency. Cook in low heat until sauce thickens.
  4. Remove cassava cake from oven then pour sauce on top, distribute evenly then place back in the oven and bake at 220C for 15 more minutes or until top turns golden brown.
source: angsarap.net

Puto

Ingredients:
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 cups white sugar
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 3 eggs
  • 3/4 cup evaporated milk
  • 3/4 cups water
  • 1 tbsp butter, melted
Toppings:
  • Edam Cheese, sliced
  • Salted duck eggs, sliced
Method:
  1. Mix all dry ingredients in a bowl, set aside
  2. Beat eggs using a hand mixer then combine all wet ingredients.
  3. Fold dry mixture into the egg mixture and once even in consistency pour into lightly greased moulds (i.e. ramekin, muffin pan or puto moulds) 2/3 full. If using salted duck eggs place them on top.
  4. Place in steamer and steam for 20-30 minutes or until toothpick inserted in the centre comes out clean. Time will depend on how big your put is.
  5. If using cheese place slices of cheese on top right after the puto is cooked.
source: angsarap.net

Hototay

Ingredients:
  • 250g pork belly
  • 1 large chicken breast
  • 1/2 cup pork liver, sliced thinly
  • 1 cup chicken gizzards, sliced
  • 6 cups chicken stock
  • 3 pcs shiitake mushrooms, rehydrated and sliced thinly
  • 1 cup straw mushrooms, cut in half
  • 1 carrot, sliced
  • 1/2 Napa cabbage, sliced
  • 6 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • egg
  • salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • oil
  • sesame oil
Method:
  1. In a pot add chicken stock, pork, gizzard and chicken bring to a boil and cook until meat is tender.
  2. Remove meat from pot then thinly slice pork pieces and flake the chicken meat. Set it aside.
  3. In a large saucepan add oil then sauté garlic and onions.
  4. Pour chicken stock then add the pork, chicken and gizzard.  Bring to a boil.
  5. Add carrots and liver and simmer to 2 minutes.
  6. Add the cabbage and mushrooms, simmer for 2 minutes. 7. Season with sesame oil, salt and freshly ground black pepper then serve in bowl while piping hot topped with a freshly cracked egg per serving.
source: angsarap.net

Pancit Bihon Guisado

Ingredients:
  • 300g Pancit bihon noodles
  • 1 1/2 cups cooked Chicken Breast, shredded
  • 1 cup shrimps, shelled and deveined
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 1/4 cabbage, sliced
  • 1 red onion, sliced
  • 4 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 carrot, sliced
  • 3/4 cup celery, chopped
  • 1/3 cup soy sauce
  • Fish sauce
  • pepper
  • 1 lemon or calamansi, sliced
  • oil
Method:
  1. Soak noodles in water for a maximum of 10 minutes. This makes it soft and easier to handle when cooking.
  2. Now using a wok, add oil and sauté garlic and onions in medium heat.
  3. Add the chicken broth, shrimps, shredded chicken and all the vegetables bring to a boil.
  4. Once boiling add noodles and soy sauce, stir fry and cook for 5 minutes 5. Season with Fish sauce and freshly ground black pepper. Serve with calamansi or lemon wedges on the side.
source: angsarap.net

Singaporean Chilli Crab

Ingredients:
  • 3 large crabs
  • 4 tbsp tomato ketchup
  • 2 tbsp chili sauce
  • juice from half lemon
  • 3 tbsp oyster sauce
  • 3 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 red onion, chopped
  • 1 tbsp grated ginger
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 long fresh red chilli (sweet and mild variant), sliced
  • 3 pcs dried chillies
  • handful of cilantro leaves, chopped peanut oil
Method:
  1. In a pot add 1 cup of water and crabs, bring to a boil and simmer until crabs are cooked.
  2.  Remove the top shell of crab and grey gills, cut it in half and crack the legs and claws.
  3. In a bowl mix ketchup, chili sauce, oyster sauce, soy sauce, lemon and 1/2 cup of water.
  4. Pour oil in a wok then sauté garlic, ginger, onions and dried chillies in medium heat for 30 seconds or until fragrant.
  5. Put heat on high then add the crabs and stir fry for a minute.
  6. Pour the sauce and sliced chillies then add the cilantro, continue to stir fry for 5 minutes and make sure crabs are evenly coated with the sauce. Sauce should be reduced to a thicker consistency.
  7. Place in a plate then serve garnished with fresh cilantro.
source: angsarap.net

Ube Halaya

Ingredients:
  • 500 g grated purple yam (can be found in frozen section of Asian stores)
  • 1 1/2 can condensed milk
  • 1  can evaporated milk
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract 1/3 cup butter
Method:
  1. In a large work add butter and melt in low heat.
  2. Add condensed milk, evaporated milk and vanilla then mix well.
  3. Add the grated purple yam then continue stirring until it becomes thick. You need to constantly stir for 20-25 minutes in low heat.
  4. Place in greased moulds then let it cool.
  5. Place in fridge or serve them warm.
source: angsarap.net

Halabos na Hipon

Ingredients:
  • 700g fresh shrimps or prawns
  • 1/2 can lemon soda (7-Up or Sprite)
  • 1 head garlic, minced
  • oil
  • salt & pepper
Method:
  1. Heat a wok on high heat then and add oil.
  2. Sauté garlic then add shrimps. Give it a quick stir don’t cook it yet.
  3. Add soda; bring it to a boil until it is reduced. Make sure you are in high heat to reduce the liquid faster, if you do this in low heat the shrimps might overcook and the shrimp shell will stick on the meat making it hard to eat.
  4. Add salt and pepper to taste.
source: angsarap.net

Friday, July 13, 2012

Pakbet

Ingredients:
  • 1/4 kilo pork with fat, cut into small pieces
  • 2 Amapalya (bitter melons) sliced to bite size pieces
  • 2 eggplants, sliced to bite size pieces
  • 5 pieces of okra, cut in two
  • 1 head garlic, minced
  • 2 onions, diced
  • 5 tomatoes, sliced
  • 1 tablespoon of ginger, crushed and sliced
  • 4 tablespoons bagoong isda or bagoong alamang
  • 3 tablespoons of oil
  • 1 1/2 cup water
  • Salt and pepper to taste
Instructions:
  1. In a cooking pan, heat oil and fry the pork until brown, remove the pork from the pan and set aside.
  2. On the same pan, saute garlic, onion, ginger and tomatoes.
  3. In a casserole, boil water and add bagoong.
  4. Add the pork in the casserole and mix in the sautéed garlic, onion, ginger and tomatoes. Bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes.
  5. Add in all the vegetables and cook until the vegetables are done, careful not to overcook.
  6. Salt and pepper to taste.
  7. Serve hot with plain rice.

Pakbet Ilokano

Ingredients:
  • 1/4 kilo pork with fat, cut into small pieces
  • 2pcs tinapa (smoked fish)
  • 2 Amapalya (bitter melons) sliced to bite size pieces
  • 2 eggplants, sliced to bite size pieces
  • 5 pieces of okra, cut in two
  • 250 grams kalabasa
  • 2 pcs bunga ng kamote
  • 1 head garlic, minced
  • 2 onions, diced
  • 5 tomatoes, sliced
  • 1 tablespoon of ginger, crushed and sliced
  • 4 tablespoons bagoong isda or bagoong alamang
  • 3 tablespoons of oil
  • 1 1/2 cup water
  • Salt and pepper to taste
Instructions:
  1. In a cooking pan, heat oil and fry the pork until brown, remove the pork from the pan and set aside.
  2. On the same pan, saute garlic, onion, ginger and tomatoes.
  3. In a casserole, boil water and add bagoong.
  4. Add the pork in the casserole and mix in the sautéed garlic, onion, ginger and tomatoes. Bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes.
  5. Add in all the vegetables and cook until the vegetables are done, careful not to overcook.
  6. Salt and pepper to taste.
  7. Serve hot with plain rice.

Logganisa

Ingredients:
  • 1 kilo ground pork (include the pork fat)
  • 1 spoon salt
  • 1 spoon brown sugar
  • 1 spoon paprika
  • 1/4 teaspoon saltpeter (salitre)
  • 1/2 teaspoon crushed laurel leaves
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon red peppers, minced
  • 4 cloves of garlic, crushed then minced
  • 1/4 cup vinegar
  • 1/8 cup soy sauce
  • Sausage casings
 Instructions:
  1. In a big mixing bowl, combine all ingredients except the sausage casings.
  2. Mix well and let stand for an hour
  3. Tie one end of the sausage casing and slowly fill the casing with the ground pork mixture until the end of the casing, then tie the end
  4. Tie the middle of the sausage casing in intervals of about 3 inches.
  5. Keep refrigerated for 2 to 3 days
To cook Longganisa:
Boil longganisa in 1/2 cup of water on a pan or wok. Water will soon evaporate then oil will ooze from the longganisa. Fry it on its own oil or add a few tablespoons of cooking oil and continue to cook for 5 to 10 minutes or until the sausage casings turn brownish.

Longganisa Serving Tips:
Longganisa is ideally served with steamed rice or fried rice.

Crispy Pata

Ingredients:
  • 1 Pata (front or hind leg of a pig including the knuckles)
  • 1 bottle of soda (7Up or sprite)
  • 1 tablespoon of salt
  • 2 tablespoons patis (fish sauce)
  • 1/2 tablespoon baking soda
  • 1 tablespoon of monosodium glutamate (MSG)
  • 4 tablespoons of flour
  • Enough oil for deep frying
  • Enough water for boiling
 Instructions:
  1. Clean the pork pata by removing all hairs and by scraping the skin with a knife. Wash thoroughly.
  2. Make four to five inch cuts on the sides of the pata.
  3. On a deep stock pot, place the pata in water with soda and salt. Bring to a boil and simmer for 20 minutes.
    Then add the baking soda and continue to simmer for another 10 minutes.
  4. Remove the pata from the pot and hang and allow to drip dry for 24 hours.
    An alternative to this is to thoroughly drain the pork pata and refrigerate for a few hours.
  5. After the above process, rub patis on the pata and sprinkle flour liberally.
  6. In a deep frying pot, heat cooking oil and deep fry the pork pata until golden brown.
Crispy Pata Dip Sauce:
Mix 3/4 cup of vinegar, 1/4 cup soy sauce, 2 cloves of crushed garlic, 1 head of diced onion and 1 hot pepper. Salt and pepper to taste.

Thursday, July 12, 2012

Morcon

Ingredients:
  • 1 kilo beef, sliced 1/4 inch thick (3 pcs.)
  • 1/4 kilo ground beef liver
  • 200 grams sliced sausages or ham
  • 200 grams pork fat (cut is strips)
  • 3 hard boiled eggs, sliced
  • 100 grams cheddar cheese in strips
  • 100 grams grated cheddar cheese
  • 2 onions, chopped
  • 5 bay leaf (laurel)
  • 1/2 teaspoon of ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup vinegar
  • 2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 cups of water
  • 2 meters thread or string (for tying)
Instructions:
  1. Spread and stretch the sliced beef on your working table.
  2. Arrange the filling on the sliced beef: sausage strips, cheese strips, sliced eggs, pork fat and some ground liver.
  3. Roll the sliced beef with all the filling inside and secure with a thread or string.
  4. Repeat the procedure for the two remaining beef slices.
  5. On a pot, place the beef rolls and put the water, the remaining ground liver, grated cheese, chopped onions, bay leaves, ground black pepper and salt.
  6. Cover the pot and bring to a boil. Simmer for one hour.
  7. Add the vinegar and continue to simmer of another hour or until beef is tender.
  8. Slice the beef morcon, arrange on a platter and top with the sauce/ gravy poured on top.
 Cooking Tips:
  • A spoon or two of flour can be added to water to thicken the sauce.
  • Instead of boiling in a pot, you can use a pressure cooker for faster cooking.
  • Optional: Garnish with olives before serving.

Pork / Beef Steak

Ingredients:
  • 3/4 kilo tender pork or beef steaks, sliced
  • 1 tablespoon kalamansi or lemon juice
  • 5 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 3 cloves of garlic
  • 1 small piece ginger, crushed
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup onions, sliced in rings
  • 4 tablespoons cooking oil
Cooking Instructions:
  1. Marinate the pork or beef steak in kalamansi (lemon) juice, garlic, ginger, soy sauce and pepper for 30 minutes.
  2. In a frying, add cooking oil. Add the marinated pork or beef steak and cook slow until done.
  3. Increase heat for a minute or two to brown steaks.
  4. Add the sliced onions and continue to cook for another minute.
  5. Serve on a platter including the oil and sauce.
  6. Best served with hot plain rice.

Beef Mechado

Ingredients:
  • 1 kilo of beef cut into chunks
  • 1/8 kilo of pork fat cut into strips
  • 4 onions, peeled and quartered
  • 5 medium potatoes, quartered (optional: fried)
  • 1 medium sized carrot, sliced in 1/2" sections
  • 2 red bell pepper, sliced
  • 2 cups beef stock or 2 bouillon cubes dissolved in water
  • 3 bay leaves (laurel leaves)
  • 1/4 -cup vinegar
  • 2 cups tomato sauce or 1/2 cup tomato paste
  • 1 cup soy sauce
  • salt & pepper to taste
Instructions:
  1. Cut an incision on the beef chunks and insert a pork strip in the middle (mitsa).
  2. In a casserole, combine the beef (with the fat), tomato sauce, soy sauce, bay leaves and beef stock. Bring to a boil and simmer until the beef is almost tender.
  3. Add the vinegar and let boil for a minute or two.
  4. Add the potatoes, onions, carrot, and bell pepper.
  5. Let simmer until potatoes and carrots are cooked - occasionally stir to thicken sauce
  6. Serve hot with white rice.
Beef Mechado Cooking Tips:
  • Pressure cook the beef with the beef stock for faster cooking time.
  • Fry the potatoes before adding to the casserole.
  • Add 2 to 3 tablespoons of olive oil and stir when the mechado dish is almost done for added flavor.

Cuisine


Cuisine (from French cuisine, "cooking; culinary art; kitchen"; ultimately from Latin coquere, "to cook") is a characteristic style of cooking practices and traditions, often associated with a specific culture. Cuisines are often named after the geographic areas or regions that they originate from. A cuisine is primarily influenced by the ingredients that are available locally or through trade. Religious food laws, such as Islamic dietary laws and Jewish dietary laws, can also exercise a strong influence on cuisine. Regional food preparation traditions, customs and ingredients often combine to create dishes unique to a particular region.

source: wikipedia

Foie gras




Foie gras (/fwɑːˈɡrɑː/; French: [fwa ɡʁɑ]); French for "fat liver") is a food product made of the liver of a duck or goose that has been specially fattened. By French law, foie gras is defined as the liver of a duck fattened by gavage (force-feeding corn), although outside of France it is occasionally produced using natural feeding. A pastry containing pâté de foie gras and bacon, or pâté de foie gras tout court, was formerly known as "Strasbourg pie" (or "Strasburg pie") in English on account of that city's being a major producer of foie gras.

Foie gras is a popular and well-known delicacy in French cuisine. Its flavor is described as rich, buttery, and delicate, unlike that of an ordinary duck or goose liver. Foie gras is sold whole, or is prepared into mousse, parfait, or pâté (the lowest quality), and may also be served as an accompaniment to another food item, such as steak. French law states that "Foie gras belongs to the protected cultural and gastronomical heritage of France."

The technique of gavage dates as far back as 2500 BC, when the ancient Egyptians began keeping birds for food and deliberately fattened the birds through force-feeding. Today, France is by far the largest producer and consumer of foie gras, though it is produced and consumed worldwide, particularly in other European nations, the United States, and China.

Gavage
-based foie gras production is controversial due to the force feeding procedure used. A number of countries and other jurisdictions have laws against force feeding or the sale of foie gras.

source: wikipedia

Gourmet


Gourmet (ɡɔrˈmeɪ/) is a cultural ideal associated with the culinary arts of fine food and drink, or haute cuisine, which is characterised by refined, even elaborate preparations and presentations of aesthetically balanced meals of several contrasting, often quite rich courses. The term and its associated practices are usually used positively to describe people of refined taste and passion.

Person
The term gourmet may refer to a person with refined or discriminating taste who is knowledgeable in the art of food and food preparation. Gourmand carries additional connotations of one who simply enjoys food in great quantities. An epicure is similar to a gourmet, but the word may sometimes carry overtones of excessive refinement.

Food
Gourmet may describe a class of restaurant, cuisine, meal or ingredient of high quality, of special presentation, or high sophistication. In the United States, a 1980s gourmet food movement evolved from a long-term division between elitist (or "gourmet") tastes and a populist aversion to fancy foods. Gourmet is an industry classification for high-quality premium foods in the United States. In the 2000s, there has been an accelerating increase in the American gourmet market, due in part to rising income, globalization of taste, and health and nutrition concerns. Individual food and beverage categories, such as coffee, are often divided between a standard and a "gourmet" sub-market.

Gourmet pursuits
Certain events such as wine tastings cater to people who consider themselves gourmets and foodies. Television programs (such as those on the Food Network) and publications such as Gourmet magazine often serve gourmets with food columns and features. Gourmet tourism is a niche industry catering to people who travel to food or wine tastings, restaurants, or food and wine production regions for leisure.

Origin of term
The word gourmet is from the French term for a wine broker or taste-vin employed by a wine dealer. Friand was formerly the reputable name for a connaisseur of delicious things that were not eaten primarily for nourishment: "A good gourmet", wrote the conservative eighteenth-century Dictionnaire de Trévoux, employing this original sense, "must have le goût friand", or a refined palate. The pleasure is also visual: "J'aime un ragoût, et je suis friand", Giacomo Casanova declared, "mais s'il n'a pas bonne mine, il me semble mauvais". In the eighteenth century, gourmet and gourmand carried disreputable connotations of gluttony, which only gourmand has retained. Gourmet was rendered respectable by Monsieur Grimod de la Reynière, whose Almanach des Gourmands, essentially the first restaurant guide, appeared in Paris from 1803 to 1812. Previously, even the liberal Encyclopédie offered a moralising tone in its entry Gourmandise, defined as "refined and uncontrolled love of good food", employing reproving illustrations that contrasted the frugal ancient Spartans and Romans of the Republic with the decadent luxury of Sybaris. The Jesuits' Dictionnaire de Trévoux took the Encyclopédistes to task, reminding its readers that gourmandise was one of the Seven Deadly Sins.

source: wikipedia

Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Cassava Cake with Red Mongo


Chef Cha's Cassava cake with red mongo toppings plus hershey's milk chocolate drippings:)

Wagyu Beef




Wagyu (和牛, Wagyū, literally Japanese cow) refers to several breeds of cattle genetically predisposed to intense marbling and to producing a high percentage of oleaginous unsaturated fat. The meat from wagyu cattle is known worldwide for its marbling characteristics, increased eating quality through a naturally enhanced flavor, tenderness and juiciness, and a high market value. In several areas of Japan, beef is shipped with area names. Some examples are Kobe, Mishima, Matsusaka, Ōmi, and Sanda beef. Highly prized for their rich flavor, these cattle produce arguably the finest beef in the world. These different breeds produce beef that range from expensive (by any measure) to extremely expensive (about US$ 50 per 150 grams of filet steak sold retail in Japan).

Wagyu cattle's genetic predisposition yields a beef that contains a higher percentage of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids than typical beef. The increased marbling also improves the ratio of monounsaturated fats to saturated fats.

The Best Sushi In The World

Beef Kaldereta

Ingredients:
  • 1 kilo beef, cut into chunks
  • 1 big can (350g) liver spread or ground liver
  • 5 onions, minced
  • 5 cloves garlic, minced
  • 6 tomatoes, sliced
  • 1 cup tomato sauce
  • 3 green peppers, diced
  • 3 red peppers, diced
  • 4 pieces hot chilli peppers, minced
  • 3/4 cup grated cheese
  • 2 cups beef stock or water
  • 1/4 cup cooking or olive oil
Instructions:
  1. In a casserole, sauté: garlic and onions in oil. Then add tomatoes, red & green pepper and chilli peppers.
  2. Add in the beef, tomato sauce, liver spread and water or stock.
  3. Salt to taste and let simmer for at least 1 hour or until the beef is tender.
  4. Add cheese and olives (optional) and continue to simmer until the sauce thickens.
  5. Serve with plain rice
Cooking Tips:
•Instead of beef, goat's meat (kambing) can be used. If goat's meat is used, marinate the meat in vinegar, garlic, salt and pepper for at least 15 minutes.

•For a special kaldereta, do not use water or beef stock. Use an equivalent weight of onions to the beef (1 kg of onions: 1 kg of beef). The onions will serve as water to the dish.

Nilagang Baka (Beef Stew)

Ingredients:
  • 1 kilo beef, cut into 1 1/2" x 1 1/2" cubes
  • 8 potatoes cut the same size as the beef
  • 1 bundle Pechay (Bok choy) cut into 2 pieces
  • 1 small cabbage, quartered
  • 5 onions, diced
  • 1 head garlic, minced
  • 4 tablespoons of patis (fish sauce)
  • 3 tablespoons of cooking oil
  • 10 corns of black pepper
  • 1 liter of water
  • Salt and pepper to taste
Instructions:
  1. In a big casserole, heat oil and sauté the garlic and onions.
  2. Add water, the beef, black pepper and patis. Bring to a boil then simmer for 1 hour or until the beef is tender.
  3. Add the potatoes. Continue to simmer until potatoes are cooked.
  4. Add the cabbage then the pechay. Do not over cook the vegetables.
  5. Salt and pepper to taste.
Cooking Tips:
You can substitute the beef with chicken (chicken stew) or pork (pork stew) for variety.

Kare Kare

Ingredients:
  • 1 kilo of beef (round or sirloin cut) cut into cubes, beef tripe or oxtail (cut 2 inch long) or a combination of all three (beef, tripe and oxtail)
  • 3 cups of peanut butter
  • 1/4 cup grounded toasted rice
  • 1/2 cup cooked bagoong alamang (anchovies)
  • 2 pieces onions, diced
  • 2 heads of garlic, minced
  • 4 tablespoons atsuete oil
  • 4 pieces eggplant, sliced 1 inch thick
  • 1 bundle Pechay (Bok choy) cut into 2 pieces
  • 1 bundle of sitaw (string beans) cut to 2" long
  • 1 banana bud, cut similar to eggplant slices, blanch in boiling water
  • 1/2 cup oil
  • 8 cups of water
  • Salt to taste
Instructions:
  1. In a stock pot, boil beef, tripe and oxtails in water for an hour or until cooked. Strain and keep the stock.
  2. In a big pan or wok, heat oil and atsuete oil.
  3. Sauté garlic, onions until golden brown, then add the stock, toasted rice, beef, oxtail and peanut butter. Bring to a boil and simmer for 15 minutes. Salt to taste.
  4. Add the eggplant, string beans, pechay and banana bud. Cook the vegetables for a few minutes - Do not overcook the vegetables.
  5. Serve with bagoong on the side and hot plain rice.

Understanding Sushi

Sushi
Sushi (すし, 寿司, 鮨, 鮓, 寿斗, 寿し, 壽司?) is a Japanese food consisting of cooked vinegared rice (shari) combined with other ingredients (neta). Neta and forms of sushi presentation vary, but the ingredient which all sushi have in common is shari. The most common neta is seafood.

Raw meat sliced and served by itself is sashimi. Sashimi (Japanese: 刺身, pronounced [saɕimiꜜ]; /səˈʃiːmiː/) is a Japanese delicacy. It consists of very fresh raw meat, most commonly fish, sliced into thin pieces.

Types of Sushi

Chirashizushi
Chirashizushi (ちらし寿司, "scattered sushi") is a bowl of sushi rice topped with a variety of sashimi and garnishes (also refers to barazushi). Edomae chirashizushi (Edo-style scattered sushi) is an uncooked ingredient that is arranged artfully on top of the sushi rice in a bowl. Gomokuzushi (Kansai-style sushi) consists of cooked or uncooked ingredients mixed in the body of rice in a bowl. There is no set formula for the ingredients; they are either chef's choice or specified by the customer. It is commonly eaten because it is filling, fast and easy to make. Chirashizushi often varies regionally. It is eaten annually on Hinamatsuri in March.



Inarizushi
Inarizushi (稲荷寿司) is a pouch of fried tofu typically filled with sushi rice alone. It is named after the Shinto god Inari, who is believed to have a fondness for fried tofu. The pouch is normally fashioned as deep-fried tofu (油揚げ, abura age). Regional variations include pouches made of a thin omelette (帛紗寿司, fukusa-zushi, or 茶巾寿司, chakin-zushi). It should not be confused with inari maki, which is a roll filled with flavored fried tofu.

A version of inarizushi that includes green beans, carrots, and gobo along with rice, wrapped in a triangular aburage (fried tofu) piece, is a Hawaiian specialty, where it is called cone sushi and is often sold in okazu-ya (Japanese delis) and as a component of bento boxes.



Makizushi
Futomaki
Hosomaki
Temakizushi
Uramaki
Makizushi (巻寿司, "rolled sushi"), Norimaki (海苔巻き, "Nori roll") or Makimono (巻物, "variety of rolls") is a cylindrical piece, formed with the help of a bamboo mat, called a makisu (巻簾). Makizushi is generally wrapped in nori (seaweed), but is occasionally wrapped in a thin omelette, soy paper, cucumber, or parsley. Makizushi is usually cut into six or eight pieces, which constitutes a single roll order. Below are some common types of makizushi, but many other kinds exist.

  • Futomaki (太巻, "thick, large or fat rolls") is a large cylindrical piece, with nori on the outside. A typical futomaki is five to six centimeters (2–2.5 in) in diameter. They are often made with two, three, or more fillings that are chosen for their complementary tastes and colors. During the evening of the Setsubun festival, it is traditional in the Kansai region to eat uncut futomaki in its cylindrical form, where it is called ehō-maki (恵方巻, lit. happy direction rolls). By 2000 the custom had spread to all of Japan. Futomaki are often vegetarian, and may utilize strips of cucumber, kampyō gourd, takenoko bamboo shoots, or lotus root. Strips of tamagoyaki omelette, tiny fish roe, chopped tuna, and oboro whitefish flakes are typical non-vegetarian fillings.
     
  • Hosomaki (細巻, "thin rolls") is a small cylindrical piece, with the nori on the outside. A typical hosomaki has a diameter of about two and a half centimeters (1 in). They generally contain only one filling, often tuna, cucumber, kanpyō, thinly sliced carrots, or, more recently, avocado. Kappamaki, (河童巻) a kind of Hosomaki filled with cucumber, is named after the Japanese legendary water imp fond of cucumbers called the kappa. Traditionally, Kappamaki is consumed to clear the palate between eating raw fish and other kinds of food, so that the flavors of the fish are distinct from the tastes of other foods. Tekkamaki (鉄火巻) is a kind of Hosomaki filled with raw tuna. Although it is believed that the name "Tekka", meaning 'red hot iron', alludes to the color of the tuna flesh or salmon flesh, it actually originated as a quick snack to eat in gambling dens called "Tekkaba" (鉄火場), much like the sandwich. Negitoromaki (ねぎとろ巻) is a kind of Hosomaki filled with scallion (negi) and chopped tuna (toro). Fatty tuna is often used in this style. Tsunamayomaki (ツナマヨ巻) is a kind of Hosomaki filled with canned tuna tossed with mayonnaise.
     
  • Temaki (手巻, "hand roll") is a large cone-shaped piece of nori on the outside and the ingredients spilling out the wide end. A typical temaki is about ten centimeters (4 in) long, and is eaten with fingers because it is too awkward to pick it up with chopsticks. For optimal taste and texture, Temaki must be eaten quickly after being made because the nori cone soon absorbs moisture from the filling and loses its crispness and becomes somewhat difficult to bite. For this reason, the nori in pre-made or take-out temaki is sealed in plastic film which is removed immediately before eating.
     
  • Uramaki (裏巻, "inside-out roll") is a medium-sized cylindrical piece with two or more fillings. Uramaki differs from other makimono because the rice is on the outside and the nori inside. The filling is in the center surrounded by nori, then a layer of rice, and an outer coating of some other ingredients such as roe or toasted sesame seeds. It can be made with different fillings, such as tuna, crab meat, avocado, mayonnaise, cucumber or carrots. In Japan, urimaki is an uncommon type of makimono because of the outer layer of rice can be quite difficult to handle with fingers.


Funazushi (Naresushi)
Narezushi (熟れ寿司, "matured sushi") is a traditional form of fermented sushi. Skinned and gutted fish are stuffed with salt, placed in a wooden barrel, doused with salt again, then weighed down with a heavy tsukemonoishi (pickling stone). As days pass, water seeps out and is removed. After six months, this sushi can be eaten, remaining edible for another six months or more. The most famous variety of narezushi still being produced is funa-zushi (made from the crucian carp of Lake Biwa), a typical dish of Shiga Prefecture.


Nigirizushi
Gunkanzushi
Temarizushi
Nigirizushi (握り寿司, "hand-formed sushi") consists of an oblong mound of sushi rice that the chef presses into a small rectangular box between the palms of the hands, usually with a bit of wasabi, and a topping (the neta) draped over it. Neta are typically fish such as salmon, tuna or other seafood. Certain toppings are typically bound to the rice with a thin strip of nori, most commonly octopus (tako), freshwater eel (unagi), sea eel (anago), squid (ika), and sweet egg (tamago). When ordered separately, nigiri is generally served in pairs. A sushi set (a sampler dish) may contain only one piece of each topping.


  • Gunkanmaki (軍艦巻, "warship roll") is a special type of nigirizushi: an oval, hand-formed clump of sushi rice that has a strip of "nori" wrapped around its perimeter to form a vessel that is filled with some soft, loose or fine-chopped ingredient that requires the confinement of nori such as roe, nattō, oysters, sea urchin, corn with mayonnaise, and quail eggs. Gunkan-maki was invented at the Ginza Kyubey restaurant in 1941; its invention significantly expanded the repertoire of soft toppings used in sushi.
  • Temarizushi (手まり寿司, "ball sushi") is a ball-shaped sushi made by pressing rice and fish into a ball-shaped form by hand using a plastic wrap. It is quite easy to make and thus a good starting point for beginners. Any toppings can be used for these little Sushi balls, from ham for kids, to vegetarian toppings and even fruits.


Oshizushi
Oshizushi (押し寿司?, "pressed sushi"), also known as 箱寿司, hako-zushi, "box sushi"), is a pressed sushi from the Kansai Region, a favorite and specialty of Osaka. A block-shaped piece formed using a wooden mold, called an oshibako. The chef lines the bottom of the oshibako with the toppings, covers them with sushi rice, and then presses the lid of the mold down to create a compact, rectilinear block. The block is removed from the mold and then cut into bite-sized pieces. Particularly famous is バッテラ (battera, pressed mackerel sushi) or 鯖寿司 (saba zushi).

Presentation
Traditionally, sushi is served on minimalist Japanese-style, geometric, mono- or duo-tone wood or lacquer plates, in keeping with the aesthetic qualities of this cuisine.

Many sushi restaurants offer fixed-price sets, selected by the chef from the catch of the day. These are often graded as shō-chiku-bai (松竹梅), shō/matsu (松, pine), chiku/take (竹, bamboo) and bai/ume), with matsu the most expensive and ume the cheapest.


Sushi may be served kaiten zushi (sushi train) style. Color coded plates of sushi are placed on a conveyor belt; as the belt passes customers choose as they please. After finishing, the bill is tallied by counting how many plates of each color have been taken. Newer kaiten zushi restaurants use barcodes or RFID tags embedded in the dishes to bill automatically and manage elapsed time after the item was prepared.


Etiquette
Unlike sashimi, which is almost always eaten with chopsticks, nigirizushi is traditionally eaten with the fingers, even in formal settings. While it is commonly served on a small platter with a side dish for dipping, sushi can also be served in a bento, a box with small compartments that hold the various dishes of the meal.

Soy sauce is the usual condiment, and sushi is normally served with a small sauce dish, or a compartment in the bento. Traditional etiquette suggests that the sushi is turned over so that only the topping is dipped; this is because the soy sauce is for flavoring the topping, not the rice, and because the rice would absorb too much soy sauce and would fall apart. If it is difficult to turn the sushi upside-down, one can baste the sushi in soy sauce using gari (sliced ginger) as a brush. Toppings which have their own sauce (such as eel) should not be eaten with soy sauce.


Traditionally, the sushi chef will add an appropriate amount of wasabi to the sushi while preparing it, and etiquette suggests eating the sushi as is, since the chef is supposed to know the proper amount of wasabi to use. However, today wasabi is more a matter of personal taste, and even restaurants in Japan may serve wasabi on the side for customers to use at their discretion, even when there is wasabi already in the roll.


History
The original type of sushi, known today as nare-zushi (馴れ寿司, 熟寿司), was first developed in Southeast Asia, possibly along what is now the Mekong River, and then spread to southern China before introduction to Japan. The term sushi comes from an archaic grammatical form no longer used in other contexts; literally, sushi means "sour-tasting", a reflection of its historic fermented roots. The oldest form of sushi in Japan, narezushi, still very closely resembles this process, wherein fish is fermented via being wrapped in soured fermenting rice. The fish proteins break down via fermentation into its constituent amino acids. The fermenting rice and fish results in a sour taste and also one of the five basic tastes, called umami in Japanese. In Japan, narezushi evolved into oshizushi and ultimately Edomae nigirizushi, which is what the world today knows as "sushi".


Contemporary Japanese sushi has little resemblance to the traditional lacto-fermented rice dish. Originally, when the fermented fish was taken out of the rice, only the fish was consumed and the fermented rice was discarded. The strong-tasting and smelling funazushi, a kind of narezushi made near Lake Biwa in Japan, resembles the traditional fermented dish. Beginning in the Muromachi period (AD 1336–1573) of Japan, vinegar was added to the mixture for better taste and preservation. The vinegar accentuated the rice's sourness and was known to increase its shelf life, allowing the fermentation process to be shortened and eventually abandoned. In the following centuries, sushi in Osaka evolved into oshi-zushi. The seafood and rice were pressed using wooden (usually bamboo) molds. By the mid 18th century, this form of sushi had reached Edo (contemporary Tokyo).


The contemporary version, internationally known as "sushi", was created by Hanaya Yohei (1799–1858) at the end of the Edo period in Edo. The sushi invented by Hanaya was an early form of fast food that was not fermented (therefore prepared quickly) and could be eaten with one's hands at a roadside or in a theatre. Originally, this sushi was known as Edomae zushi because it used freshly caught fish in the Edo-mae (Edo Bay or Tokyo Bay). Though the fish used in modern sushi no longer usually comes from Tokyo Bay, it is still formally known as Edomae nigirizushi.

source: wikipedia
source links: sushimasters   |  chirashizushi  |  inarizushi-with-tuna  |  recipes.eat-japan  |  hosomaki  |  temakizushi  |  uramaki  |  narezushi  |  nigirizushi  |  gunkanzushi  |  temarizushi  |  oshizushi

Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Giant Burger Craze in Manila

Jawbreaker burgers served with fries.

Tombstone burgers served with fries.

Luther Burger served with fries.

MANILA, Philippines – Long lines of loyal patrons and curious customers occupied Taft Avenue over the weekend as they patiently waited for their turn to eat a five-inch tall burger.

Last July 7, Zark’s Burgers successfully held the first part of its seventh “Jawbreaker Day” named after its signature item -- a greasy five-inch tall triple-patty burger with Spam, bacon, tomatoes, greens and cheese sauce.

Originally priced at P250, the Jawbreaker was sold at P150 to 1,500 customers during the event.
Zark’s said some customers had to queue up for as long as seven hours to get a bite of the heart attack-inducing burger. Read more...

source link: ABS-CBN

Pork Menudo

Ingredients:
  • 1/2 kilo pork (cut into small chunks)
  • 1/4 kilo pork liver (cut into small cubes)
  •  5 pieces chorizo Bilbao (also cut in small pieces)
  • 4 potatoes (peeled, cut in small cubes, fried)
  • 1 green and 1 red bell pepper (diced)
  • 1 cup chickpeas
  • 1/4 cup raisins
  • 1/2 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 cup pork or chicken stock
  • 2 teaspoons of patis (fish sauce)
  • 3 tablespoons oil
  • 1 tablespoon atsuete oil (optional)
  • 3 tomatoes (diced)
  • 1 small head of garlic (minced)
  • 1 medium size onion (diced)
Instructions:
  1. In a pan or wok, heat cooking oil and atsuete oil.
  2. Saute garlic, onion. Then add the pork, liver, chorizo de Bilabo, tomatoes, bell pepper, paprika, patis and the stock.
  3. Cover and bring to a boil. Simmer for 20 minutes or until the pork is tender.
  4. Add the chickpeas, potatoes and raisins. Boil of another 2 minutes.
  5. Salt and pepper to taste.
  6. Serve hot with white rice.

Pork Sinigang

Ingredients:
  • 3/4 kilo Pork, cut into chunks
  • 3 tomatoes, sliced
  • 2 onions, diced
  • 5 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 100 grams Kangkong (river spinach)
  • 100 grams String beans
  • 2 pieces horse radishes, sliced
  • 3 pieces gabi (taro), pealed
  • 2 pieces sili pang sigang (green finger pepper)
  • 200 grams sampalok (tamarind)
  • 3 tablespoons of patis (fish sauce)
  • 1 liter of rice wash or water
Instructions:
  1. Boil sampalok in water until the shell shows cracks. Let cool then peal off the shells and with a strainer, pour samplalok (including water) into a bowl. Gently massage the sampalok meat off the seeds, strain again.
  2. In a pot, sauté garlic and onion then add the tomatoes. Let simmer for 5 minutes.
  3. Add pork and fish sauce then add the rice wash. Bring to a boil then simmer for 15 minutes then add the gabi. Continue to simmer for another 15 minutes or until the pork is tender.
  4. Add the horse radish and simmer for 10 minutes then add the string beans, kangkong and sili (for spice-optional). Let boil for 2 minutes.
  5. Serve piping hot.
Sinigang Cooking Tip:

Instead of sampalok fruit (tamarind), you can substitute it with any commercial souring seasoning like Knorr sampalok seasoning or tamarind bouillon cubes for this pork sinigang recipe.

Get Food Stains Off Your Fingers

Potatoes will take food stains off your fingers. Just slice and rub raw potato on the stains and rinse with water.

Chef


A chef is a person who cooks professionally for other people. Although over time the term has come to describe any person who cooks for a living, traditionally it refers to a highly skilled professional who is proficient in all aspects of food preparation.

The word "chef" is borrowed (and shortened) from the French term chef de cuisine (French pronunciation: [ʃɛf.də.kɥi.zin]), the director or head of a kitchen. (The French word comes from Latin caput and is cognate with English "chief".) In English, the title "chef" in the culinary profession originated in the haute cuisine of the 19th century. Today it is often used to refer to any professional cook, regardless of rank, though in most classically defined kitchens, it refers to the head chef, others, in North American parlance, are 'cooks'.

Below are various titles given to those working in a professional kitchen and each can be considered a title for a type of chef. Many of the titles are based on the
brigade de cuisine (or brigade system) documented by Auguste Escoffier, while others have a more general meaning depending on the individual kitchen.

Chef de cuisine, executive chef and head chef
This person is in charge of all things related to the kitchen, which usually includes menu creation, management of kitchen staff, ordering and purchasing of inventory, and plating design. Chef de cuisine is the traditional French term from which the English word chef is derived. Head chef is often used to designate someone with the same duties as an executive chef, but there is usually someone in charge of them, possibly making the larger executive decisions such as direction of menu, final authority in staff management decisions, etc. This is often the case for chefs with several restaurants.

Sous-chef

The Sous-Chef de Cuisine (under-chef of the kitchen) is the second in command and direct assistant of the Chef. This person may be responsible for scheduling and substituting when the Chef is off-duty and will also fill in for or assist the Chef de Partie (line cook) when needed. This person is responsible for inventory, cleanliness of the kitchen, organization and constant training of all employees. The "Sous-Chef" is responsible for taking commands from the Chef and following through with them. The "Sous-Chef" is responsible for line checks and rotation of all product. Smaller operations may not have a sous-chef, while larger operations may have several.

Chef de partie
A chef de partie, also known as a "station chef" or "line cook", is in charge of a particular area of production. In large kitchens, each station chef might have several cooks and/or assistants. In most kitchens, however, the station chef is the only worker in that department. Line cooks are often divided into a hierarchy of their own, starting with "first cook", then "second cook", and so on as needed.

source: wikipedia

Accidentally Over-Salt


If you accidentally over-salt a dish while it's still cooking, drop in a peeled potato and it will absorb the excess salt for an instant "fix me up" .

Food Network Chefs' Greatest Cooking Tips

Food Network Magazine asked top chefs across the country for their best advice. Here's what the Food Network stars had to say — in their own words, and their own handwriting. Read more...


Testing a Knife's Sharpness by Bob Kramer and Zwilling J.A. Henckels

Kitchen Knife Basics by Zwilling J.A. Henckels

Wok

Image grabbed from wagshalsblog

A Wok (in Cantonese) (simplified Chinese: 镬; traditional Chinese: 鑊; Jyutping: wok6) is a versatile round-bottomed cooking vessel originating in China. It is one of the most common cooking utensils in China and also used in East and Southeast Asia.

Woks are often used for stir frying, steaming, pan frying, deep frying, poaching, boiling, braising, searing, stewing, making soup, smoking, roasting nuts. Wok cooking is done with a long handled chahn (spatula) or hoak (ladle). The long extensions of these utensils allow the cook to work with the food without burning the hand.

source: wikipedia

Tongs


Tongs are used for gripping and lifting tools, of which there are many forms adapted to their specific use. Some are merely large pincers or nippers, but the greatest number fall into three classes:
  1. Tongs which have long arms terminating in small flat circular ends of tongs and are pivoted close to the handle, as in the common fire-tongs, used for picking up pieces of coal and placing them on a fire.
  2. Tongs consisting of a single band of metal bent round one or two bands joined at the head by a spring, as in sugar-tongs (a pair of usually silver tongs with claw-shaped or spoon-shaped ends for serving lump sugar), asparagus-tongs and the like.
  3. Tongs in which the pivot or joint is placed close to the gripping ends, such as a driller's round tongs, blacksmith's tongs or crucible-tongs.
The tongs are the most-used cooking utensil when grilling, as they provide a way to move, rotate and turn the food with delicate precision.

source: wikipedia

Whisk


A Whisk is a cooking utensil used in food preparation to blend ingredients smooth, or to incorporate air into a mixture, in a process known as whisking or whipping. Most whisks consist of a long, narrow handle with a series of wire loops joined at the end. The wires are usually metal, but some are plastic for use with nonstick cookware. Whisks are also made from bamboo.
Whisks are commonly used to whip egg whites into a firm foam to make meringue, or to whip cream into whipped cream.
A makeshift whisk may be constructed by taking two forks and placing them together so the tines interlock and make a cage. This is far more effective than a single fork at incorporating air into a mixture.
Whisks have differently-shaped loops depending on their intended functions:
  • The most common shape is that of a wide teardrop, termed a balloon whisk. Balloon whisks are best suited to mixing in bowls, as their curved edges conform to a bowl's concave sides.
  • With longer, narrower wire loops, the French whisk has a more cylindrical profile, suiting it to deep, straight-sided pans.
  • A flat whisk, sometimes referred to as a roux whisk, has the loops arranged in a flat successive pattern. It is useful for working in shallow vessels like skillets (in which a roux is normally prepared).
  • A gravy whisk, sometimes referred to as a spiral whisk, commonly has one main loop with another wire coiled around it.
  • Similarly, a twirl whisk has one single wire that is spiralled into a balloon shape.
  • Ball whisks have no loops whatsoever. Instead, a group of individual wires comes out of the handle, each tipped with a metal ball. The heavy balls are capable of reaching into the corners of a straight-sided pan. Since there are no crossing wires, the ball whisk is easier to clean than traditional looped varieties. Manufacturers of ball whisks also purport that their shape allows for better aeration.
  • A Cage whisk, sometimes referred to as a ball whisk, is a balloon whisk with a small spherical cage trapped inside of if, which in turn holds a metal ball.
Additionally, a mechanical device known as a rotary whisk consists of 2 sets of beaters that are joined together with a hand-operated crank and handle.
Although the modern whisk may have only appeared at the end of the 19th century, evidence of whisk-like tools exist even further back in history. A bundle of twigs fastened together make an effective whisk; often the wood used would lend a certain fragrance to the dish. An 18th century Shaker recipe calls to “Cut a handful of peach twigs which are filled with sap at this season of the year. Clip the ends and bruise them and beat the cake batter with them. This will impart a delicate peach flavor to the cake.”

source: wikipedia

Slotted Spoon


A Slotted Spoon is an implement used in food preparation. The term can be used to describe any spoon with slots, holes or other openings in the bowl of the spoon which let liquid pass through while preserving the larger solids on top. It is similar in function to a sieve; however, a ladle-sized slotted spoon is most typically used to retrieve items from a cooking liquid while preserving the liquid in the pot, while table-sized slotted spoons are often used to serve foods prepared or packaged in juices, such as canned fruit and vegetables.

source: wikipedia

Cutlery


Cutlery refers to any hand implement used in preparing, serving, and especially eating food in the Western world. It is more usually known as silverware or flatware in the United States, where cutlery usually means knives and related cutting instruments. This is probably the original meaning of the word. Since silverware suggests the presence of silver, the term tableware has come into use.

The major items of cutlery in the Western world are the knife, fork and spoon. In recent times, utensils have been made combining the functionality of pairs of cutlery, including the spork (spoon / fork), spife (spoon / knife), and knork (knife / fork) or the sporf which is all three.

source: wikipedia

Monday, July 9, 2012

Spatula


The term Spatula is used to refer to various small implements with a broad, flat, flexible blade used to mix, spread and lift materials including foods, drugs, plaster and paints. The term derives from the Latin word for a flat piece of wood or splint (a diminutive form of the Latin spatha, meaning broadsword), and hence can also refer to a tongue depressor. The words spade (digging tool) and spathe are similarly derived. The word spatula is known to have been used in English since 1525.

In referring to kitchen utensils, spatula can often refer to any utensil fitting the above description. One variety is alternately referred to as a turner, and is used to lift and turn food items during cooking, such as pancakes and fillets. These are usually made of plastic, with a wooden or plastic handle to insulate them from heat.

source: wikipedia

Measuring Spoon


A Measuring Spoon is a spoon used to measure an amount of an ingredient, either liquid or dry, when cooking. Measuring spoons may be made of plastic, metal, and other materials. They are available in many sizes, including teaspoon and tablespoon. In the U.S., a measuring spoon is number of pieces, especially four or six. This usually includes ¼, ½, and 1 teaspoons and 1 tablespoon.

source: wikipedia

Bottle Opener



A Bottle Opener is a device that enables the removal of metal bottle caps from bottles. More generally, it might be thought to include corkscrews used to remove cork or plastic stoppers from wine bottles.

A metal bottle cap is affixed to the rim of the neck of a bottle by being pleated or ruffled around the rim. A bottle opener is a specialized lever inserted beneath the pleated metalwork, which uses a point on the bottle cap as a fulcrum on which to pivot.

source: wikipedia

Can Opener


A Can Opener (or tin opener) is a device used to open metal cans. Although preservation of food using tin cans had been practiced since at least 1772 in the Netherlands, the first can openers were patented only in 1855 in England and in 1858 in the United States. Those openers were basically variations of a knife, and the 1855 design continues to be produced. The first opener employing the now familiar sharp rotating wheel, which runs around the can's rim cutting the lid, was invented in 1870 but was difficult to operate. A breakthrough came in 1925 when a second, serrated wheel was added to hold the cutting wheel on the rim of the can. This easy to use design has become one of the most popular can opener models.

Around the time of World War II, several can openers were developed for military use, such as the American P-38 and P-51. These featured a robust and simple design where a folding cutting blade and absence of a handle significantly reduced the opener size. Electric can openers were introduced in the late 1950s and met with success. The development of new can opener types continues with the recent addition of a side-cutting model.

source: wikipedia

Ladle


A Ladle is a type of serving spoon used for soup, stew, or other foods. Although designs vary, a typical ladle has a long handle terminating in a deep bowl, frequently with the bowl oriented at an angle to the handle to facilitate lifting liquid out of a pot or other vessel and conveying it to a bowl. Some ladles involve a point on the side of the basin to allow for finer stream when pouring the liquid; however, this can create difficulty for left handed users, as it is easier to pour towards one's self. Thus, many of these ladles feature such pinches on both sides.

Ladles are usually made of the same stainless steel alloys as other kitchen utensils; however, they can be made of aluminium, silver, plastics, melamine resin, wood, bamboo or other materials. Ladles are made in a variety of sizes depending upon use; for example, the smaller sizes of less than 5 inches in length are used for sauces or condiments, while extra large sizes of more than 15 inches in length are used for soup or punch.

source: wikipedia

Tuna Fish Steak

Ingredients:
  • 1 whole Tuna fish (works with other fish as well)
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup vinegar
  • 1 whole garlic (chopped)
  • 1 tsp. ginger (chopped)
  • salt and pepper
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
Directions:
  1. Clean fish then slice to approximately half and inch thick.
  2. Wash the fish slices then drain excess water.
  3. Mix soy sauce, vinegar, garlic, ginger, salt and pepper together.
  4. Marinate fish in mixture for about 1 hour.
  5. Heat oil in a pan and begin frying the fish, fry fish until  well done.
  6. Set fish aside in a serving plate after frying.
Making the sauce:

Ingredients:
  • 1/3 cup soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon full sugar
  • 1 tablespoon oyster sauce
  • 2 tablespoon oil
  • dash of pepper
  • 2 tablespoons water (optional)
  • 2 whole onions (ringed)
Directions:
  1. Mix all ingredients in a saucepan except oil.
  2. Bring to boil in low heat, do not stir.
  3. Cook until mixture thickens lightly.
  4. Add onion rings, cook slightly.
  5. Turn heat off then add oil.
  6. Pour sauce on top of fish.
  7. Enjoy!

Taba ng Talangka a.k.a. Aligue

Image grabbed from thehappilyeverafterproject.com
Image grabbed from thehappilyeverafterproject.com

Taba ng Talangka a.k.a. Aligue (Crab paste) a traditional specialty of Pampanga, is made from a shore crab meat and fat, mixed with natural cane vinegar, salt, spices and coconut oil. Available in 8 oz. bottles. Great sauce that goes practically with anything you eat (IMO). However, go easy on this as it's so heavy in cholesterol.

What is Crab Aligue?